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Lee Eidelberg

Lee Eidelberg

Levin & Gann, P.A.
  • Criminal Law, DUI & DWI, Domestic Violence...
  • District of Columbia, Maryland, New York
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Summary

Lee J. Eidelberg is a former Assistant State's Attorney for Baltimore County with extensive experience in criminal and traffic court, having prosecuted many hundreds of cases during his tenure in public service, including serious felonies and misdemeanor violations. Since entering private practice more than 20 years ago, Lee has brought a unique combination of extensive trial skills, passion, and commitment to protecting his clients' rights, whether defending CDL holders charged with federal regulation violations, common motorists charged with DUI, or appearing on behalf of both Maryland and out-of-state drivers charged with non-incarcerable moving violations. Lee also assertively pursues financial compensation from insurance companies for accident victims who have suffered serious bodily injuries resulting from motor vehicle collisions, work-related accidents, and medical negligence. Rated AV- Preeminent by Martindale-Hubbell and Rated "Superb" and "Clients Choice" by the AVVO legal directory, Lee is also annually recognized by Baltimore Magazine as a Maryland "Super Lawyer" in the field of Plaintiff's personal injury law.

Practice Areas
  • Criminal Law
  • DUI & DWI
  • Domestic Violence
  • Traffic Tickets
  • Medical Malpractice
  • Personal Injury
  • Workers' Compensation
Fees
  • Free Consultation
    Free 30 minute phone consultation. In person consultations by appointment only.
  • Credit Cards Accepted
    All major credit cards accepted.
  • Contingent Fees
    Personal injury and medical malpractice cases only.
Jurisdictions Admitted to Practice
District of Columbia
District of Columbia Bar
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Maryland
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New York
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Professional Experience
Principal
Levin & Gann, P.A.
- Current
Senior Associate
Venable LLP
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Senior Associate responsible for defense of toxic tort claims and white collar criminal defense investigations and charges.
Prosecutor
State's Attorney for Baltimore County, Maryland
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Prosecutor of misdemeanor and felony charges in the District and Circuit Courts, including narcotics possession, domestic violence, homicide, arson, DUI and related serious traffic violations. Chief, Felony Review and Repeated Offender Units.
Education
National College of District Attorneys
Certificate of Completion (1986) | Trial Skills - Prosecution of Criminal Offenses
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Attendee of National College of District Attorneys. Participated in diverse curriculum regarding the development of trial skills and the evaluation and prosecution of criminal offenses
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University of Baltimore School of Law
J.D. (1983)
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Honors: Moot Court Board Honor Court Prosecutor
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University of Maryland - College Park
B.S. (1979) | Marketing Management
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University of Maryland - College Park Logo
Awards
Top 5% plaintiffs personal injury
Super Lawyers
AV Rated Preimminent
Martindale - Hubbell
10/10 "Superb"
Avvo Legal Directory
Top 100 Trial Lawyers
The National Trial Lawyers
Nation's Top One Percent
National Association of Distinguished Counsel
Professional Associations
Maryland Association for Justice
Member
- Current
Activities: Automobile and Medical Negligence Sections
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District of Columbia Bar
Member
- Current
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Maryland Bar Association
Member
- Current
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Speaking Engagements
Trial Preparation From Start to Finish for Paralegals, Institute for Paralegal Education, Baltimore, MD
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Featured speaker to paralegals concerning the preparation of trial notebooks
Websites & Blogs
Website
Website
Protective Orders v. Peace Orders - What's the Difference
Blog
Alcohol Beverage Violations
Blog
Maryland Shoplifting - Civil Liabilities of the Criminal Defendant
Blog
New Procedures for Payable Traffic Tickets - Maryland Offenders
Blog
Out of State Driving Convictions - Do Points Transfer to My Maryland Driving Record
Blog
Maryland's Misuse of Electronic Mail Statute
Legal Answers
15 Questions Answered

Q. Minor car wreck, police report says "charges pending". How do I find out if formal charges are ever actually filed?
A: Depending on the charge(s) and the jurisdiction, you could receive a notice to appear at a "preliminary inquiry," which requires one to report to a court commissioner to be formally advised of one's charges, one's right to an attorney and other pertinent information. This generally occurs when traffic citations calling for a possible jail sentence are issued. You might also receive, via mailing, a summons to appear in court on a designated date, at which time you can be served with charging documents by the State's Attorney's Office and advised of your rights by the presiding judge. You can also check the Judiciary Case Search on line, under your name, and determine if any charges against you exist. The answer to your question largely depends on the particular charge(s) that you may face.
Q. Got a slew of tickets in 2005 ,no DUI's all moving violations..The fines totaled $1000.00...Can these be removed?
A: You can either pay the fines - which will lift the suspensions but result in the highest point assessment for any single violation to appear on your driving record - or request in writing that the court recall the suspensions and set the violations in for trial. Given the age of the violations, a court may not grant your request unless all of the fines are paid in advance, as "collateral." However, once a trial is set, there is no way to know whether the Officer(s) who issued the citation(s) are still employed, will appear in court, and/or have any records to refer back to for purposes of proving the violations. If that were to occur, and you were found not guilty of one or more of the violations, the State would refund the "collateral" for those citations that could not be proven. It is also possible, based on my past experience with this type of scenario, that a court would grant a request to reset the violations but only for purposes of a "waiver hearing," rather than a trial. A waiver hearing results in a trial date at which the Officer is excused from appearing to offer testimony/evidence and the defendant is only given the right to plead guilty with an explanation. I've had a Judge do that to me in the past and while I did not contest the Court's action in that particular circumstance, there is some question whether the Court exceeded its authority in depriving my client the right to confront his accusers.
Q. Should i go to court for my registration, i was not able to show to cop on demand. It was in my car the whole time?
A: This is not a moving violation, so paying the fine will not result in any points to your driving record. That being said, if you go to court and explain the situation to the Judge - provided you have a good driving record - the judge might grant you a probation before judgment - which avoids the technical conviction on your record, and reduce the fine specified on your citation. Oftentimes, in these situations, one must weigh the time and possible inconvenience that could result by going to court for that kind of result, versus just paying the violation, knowing that it results in no points and is not considered a moving violation more likely to affect your insurance rates.
Q. I received a following too close offense, can a lawyer negotiate to an offense with no points??
A: You have two situations at hand. The first is requesting that the court recall your "failure to comply" suspension, which occurred when you failed to appear for your court date. This can be accomplished by informal written request, formal motion and/or the necessity of you having to submit the fine listed on the citation, in advance, as "collateral" for your court date. Much could depend on the particular jurisdiction in which the case lies. The second concerns retaining an attorney to represent you in court. If you have a decent driving record, you may be entitled to "probation before judgment," a disposition where the court withholds a guilty finding on your record and you avoid the point(s) associated with your violation. I wonder, however, since I see you posted your inquiry whether you have a Maryland license or a D.C. license, which could make a difference in terms of your concern about a point assessment for the offense.
Q. What is the fine for tailgating in Maryland and are there any points on your drivers license
A: Following too closely, which is the statutory offense i believe youre describing, is a 1 pt. offense unless you contributed to an accident, which is a 3 point offense. The maximum fine is $500.00, although the recommended fine is significantly less.
Q. Is it OK to cross double yellow line to pass a slow car in Maryland, like you can for a horse carriage or farm tractor?
A: No. There has to be a broken line in your direction. The double yellow line is there because of the risk of encountering oncoming traffic.
Q. Expungement
A: You can personally obtain expungement forms from the clerk of the court or hire an attorney to assist you.
Q. I received a speeding ticket out of state Section 3361 Driving At Safe Speed. Should I file guilty or not guilty? Thanks
A: Points did not transfer from Pennsylvania to Maryland for a speeding violation, although a conviction in Pennsylvania can appear on your Maryland driving record. You'd be best to confer with a Pennsylvania attorney to determine whether the expense and effort are worth fighting a ticket, depending on the specific facts and circumstances concerning your citation.
Q. if pedestrian is already in unmarked crosswalk, does driver have to yield right of way (maryland)
A: Whether or not the crosswalk is "marked," a pedestrian crossing the street at a crosswalk has the right of way. The preference the pedestrian enjoys, however, is not unlimited and does not relieve the pedestrian of the duty to use reasonable care to avoid injury. The analysis concerns whether the pedestrian described in your scenario (rather than merely the question you posed) is actually in what the law defines as a crosswalk. An unmarked crosswalk is defined as "that part of a roadway that is within the prolongation or connection of the lateral lines of "sidewalks" at any place where two or more roadways meet or join, measured from the curbs or, in the absence of curbs, from the edges of the roadway." Section 21-101(f) of the Transportation Article.
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Contact & Map
502 Washington Avenue
Towson, MD 21204
USA
Telephone: (410) 321-0600