Vanessa Jean Gorden

Vanessa Jean Gorden

GordenLaw, LLC
  • Family Law, Divorce, Juvenile Law
  • Nebraska, South Dakota
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Summary

Vanessa attended the University of South Dakota for college, graduate school, and law school, and earned her J.D. from the University of South Dakota School of Law in 2005. She is a member of the Thomas Sterling Honor Society, the highest honor bestowed upon the top 10% of students in each USD Law graduating class. Prior to moving to Lincoln in 2008, Vanessa practiced law in rural northeastern Nebraska. Throughout her career, Vanessa has concentrated on representing individuals in family law, juvenile law, and guardianship/adoption matters in probate court. Vanessa was honored to be part of the 2008-2009 Nebraska State Bar Association Leadership Academy. She has also served as Chair of the Volunteer Lawyers' Project committee for the Nebraska State Bar. Recently Vanessa was honored to receive the "10 Best Client Satisfaction Award" from the American Institute of Family Law Attorneys in 2016 and the "Top 10 Attorneys Under 40" award from the National Academy Of Family Law Attorneys in 2015.

Practice Areas
  • Family Law
  • Divorce
  • Juvenile Law
Fees
  • Credit Cards Accepted
Jurisdictions Admitted to Practice
Nebraska
South Dakota
Languages
  • English
Professional Experience
Attorney/Owner
GordenLaw, LLC
- Current
Education
University of South Dakota School of Law
J.D. (2005) | Law
-
Honors: Thomas Sterling Honor Society (Top 10% of graduating class); CALI awards in Property and Jurisprudence
Activities: R.D. Hurd Pro Bono Society; Delta Theta Phi Law Fraternity
Awards
10 Best Client Satisfaction
American Institute of Family Law Attorneys
Top 10 Family Law Attorneys Under 40
National Academy of Family Law Attorneys
Professional Associations
Nebraska State Bar # 23294
Member
Current
Speaking Engagements
"Filing for Divorce" & "Effective Use of Discovery", Divorce Law Guide A to Z, Omaha, Nebraska
National Business Institute, Inc.
Websites & Blogs
Website
GordenLaw, LLC
Legal Answers
15 Questions Answered

Q. Does parent time mean neither the father nor mother have custody?
A: Alot of the answers to your questions are going to depend on how you are otherwise doing on probation and how your child's father is doing with his. Are you drug testing and testing clean? Are you living in a safe and stable environment? Obtaining prenatal medical care? Otherwise following the rules? Is your boyfriend following the rules, sober and stable? If so, you should talk to your juvenile court attorney about asking to have that probation condition lifted so that the father can be more involved. However, you cannot sneak around - that will only harm both of your cases if you are ordered not to be together. Parenting time is the legal term that is for when each parent has possession of or time with the child. Custody is both legal (the right to make decisions for the child in school, medical care, and religion) and physical (the right to the primary residence of the child). You have a constitutional right to parent unless you are unfit and unable to provide your child a safe home. Best wishes!
Q. How do I go forward when judge has ordered it a civil case in regards to back alimony
A: All money judgment enforcements are civil actions. Your question is a bit unclear as to where you are in the process, but I would note that the process for civil or criminal contempt for nonpayment is the same. If you did not receive alimony at the time of your divorce, you can never have it awarded post-dissolution, but you may have some other civil cause of action against your former spouse (for example, if you are being sued for his/her debt or a joint debt, you may be able to bring him/her into the action as a co-defendant). Your best bet is to consult with an experienced attorney in your jurisdiction so you can confidentially review the specific details in your matter and learn about your options. Best wishes!
Q. Should I pay the closing costs for my ex husband to refinance the home in his name?
A: The answer lies in your Divorce Decree. If it says you are responsible to help pay those costs, you are. If it does not say that, don't do it. It's really that simple. If the Decree makes him responsible to refinance, he has an obligation to do it if it's at reasonable cost and he could be subject to contempt if he does not do so. If you have questions about how to interpret your Decree or whether you may have a contempt action if he fails to refinance, you should either contact the lawyer who helped with your divorce case or another local family law attorney and have them help you review your Decree for your options. Best wishes!
Q. If i file for child support and father pays half of daycare expenses, does that come out of child support amount?
A: Child support is separate from daycare and medical expenses, it does not come out of the amount he will be required to pay. However, if paying child support and daycare would put the father under the poverty line, he would not be ordered to share the daycare costs. I hope this is helpful! Best!
Q. Can a judge in Nebraska give temporary custody of children with a case in Nebraska to their father in Iowa?
A: Your daughter will need to hire an attorney right away to address this issue. Ex parte orders (orders issued without hearing) are very temporary in nature and can only be in place for a couple of weeks before a hearing is held where she will have the chance to provide her own information and concerns. However, ex parte orders are generally disfavored and the evidence provided has to suggest a serious risk of harm to the child for a judge to change custody temporarily even with a hearing. The fact that one parent lives out of state following a divorce does not change the judge's authority to place with that parent. Best wishes to you and your family as you navigate this difficult situation. (Note that this answer is provided for educational and general informational purposes only and is not intended to be relied upon as legal advice, nor does the exchange on Justia create an attorney-client relationship or attorney-client privilege).
Q. If I was married in 2018 but the divorce wasn't final till 2019 do you we file our taxes together or separately
A: You have a choice for the 2018 filings because you were married the entire year. If you both agree you can file jointly and split a return (get that in writing), or you can each file as married filing separately. If your divorce decree deals with the tax issue, you must follow the court order. Best wishes!
Q. Can my child's father be indicted for not be present in the said childs life and be charged for child abandonment??
A: The terms you are using ("indictment" and "charged") do not really apply to paternity and parenting situations. If father signed a Notarized Acknowledgment of Paternity, that serves as a legal basis for paternity under Nebraska law. However, more must occur in the courts for him to have the responsibility to pay support or to have rights of parenting time for the child. If child support has been established and court-ordered and he does not pay, he may eventually be held criminally liable for non-support through the courts. You will want to visit with an attorney confidentially about your options and what it is you are attempting to accomplish. Abandonment may be alleged and used as a basis to terminate a parent's rights, which would remove forever any right or obligation he would have for the child and free the child for a stepparent adoption. If you are attempting to enforce support, that is a civil action that could be done through NDHHS or privately. Please know however that there is no law that can force a parent to be a good parent with regard to parenting time or contact with the child. Best wishes to you! (The above is intended for general educational purposes and not as legal advice for your specific situation. No attorney-client relationship is or can be established with GordenLaw and its attorneys without a written fee agreement).
Q. I need help getting emancipated I’m 16 years old with a good paying job
A: Hello. If you do not have a stable home and your parents are taking advantage of money you are earning, you are unlikely to be emancipated. Emancipation is very rare and typically only available to those who are already living independently despite their minority. However, you may qualify for assistance from the Department of Health and Human Services. If a juvenile case is opened, you could be placed in foster care, in a group home, or on an independent living plan, depending on your situation. You can call the hotline, talk to a trusted teacher or school counselor or other adult, etc. to get this started. Best wishes to you!
Q. My mom cut me out and I was wondering if I was able to get visitation with my siblings? Im 15
A: Technically, there is no legal right to sibling visitation unless there is a juvenile case opened where all of the children are involved. That said, a number of concerns come to mind. At 15, even if you have a job and an appropriate place to stay, being "cut out" by a parent prevents you from doing all sorts of things, including registering for school, seeking medical care, etc. Unless you are residing with another parent or a person who has been given a delegation of parental powers by one of your parents, this will not be a workable solution as someone has to sign consents for you until you are of legal age (19 in Nebraska). You really need to speak with a trusted adult about this situation and whether your remaining siblings are safe at home with your mother. Even if you have engaged in illegal behaviors, your parents remain responsible for your well-being until you are 19 years old. In the event a juvenile court case were to open involving you and/or your siblings, there would be third parties to assist in arranging sibling visitation. Best wishes!
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GordenLaw, LLC
610 J Street Suite 220
Lincoln, NE 68508
USA
Telephone: (402) 817-1450
Fax: (402) 817-1736