Zachary C Ashby

Zachary C Ashby

Pacific Northwest Family Law
  • Family Law, Divorce
  • Washington
Badges
Claimed Lawyer ProfileQ&ASocial MediaResponsive Law
Biography

Before law school, I was going to be a Professor of Spanish Literature because I love books and learning about people and cultures. But a few things came up along my way into academia—kids. My oldest are twins and were born just before I finished as an undergraduate at BYU. My third was born when I was finishing up graduate school at Stanford. Number four came along part way through law school. I love being a father and I discovered that people are far more interesting than books. Being an attorney empowers me to help resolve problems.

Practice Areas
    Family Law
    Adoption, Child Custody, Child Support, Father's Rights, Guardianship & Conservatorship, Paternity, Prenups & Marital Agreements, Restraining Orders, Same Sex Family Law
    Divorce
    Collaborative Law, Contested Divorce, Military Divorce, Property Division, Same Sex Divorce, Spousal Support & Alimony, Uncontested Divorce
Fees
  • Credit Cards Accepted
Jurisdictions Admitted to Practice
Washington
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Languages
  • Catalan: Spoken, Written
  • English: Spoken, Written
  • Portuguese: Spoken, Written
  • Spanish: Spoken, Written
Professional Experience
Partner
Pacific Northwest Family Law
- Current
Attorney
Ashby Law
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Education
Brigham Young University
J.D. (2015)
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Stanford University
Ph.D. (2013) | Iberian and Latin American Cultures
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Brigham Young University
B.A. (2007) | Comparative Literature
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Awards
Litigator of the Year
American Institute of Trial Lawyers
Pro Bono Service
Benton Franklin Legal Aid Society
Professional Associations
Family Law Executive Committee WSBA
Member
- Current
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Washington State Bar Association  # 49617
Member
- Current
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Benton Franklin County Bar Association
Member
- Current
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Rotary International
Member
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Legal Answers
18 Questions Answered
Q. If I have primary custody of my son currently, and want to modify the order to have sole custody. What steps do I take?
A: It can be difficult when dealing with an ex who has their own emotional problems. While Washington law favors parenting plans where both parents are able to parent according to their own style, it can be possible to limit and condition the time the other parent spends with the child. For example, it is possible to require the other parent to attend counseling with the child, only have supervised access, or limit what decisions the other parent is able to make. But these limitations can be very difficult to prove and put in place, especially when you already have a parenting plan in place. It is important that you consult an attorney and see what options you have given your circumstnaces.
Q. Wrongly served parenting plan
A: You are right that person service requires service at your place of residence or to you directly. So if someone attempted to serve you at a place you do not live, service was not proper. This is true even if your friend later delivers the documents to you. But that doesn't mean you should ignore the case. You need to participate. Because if your ex believes that is where you reside and no one tells the court otherwise, you could be found in default and orders entered granting everything he asked for in the parenting plan. You should talk to an attorney if you are concerned with your ex so that you can present the facts in a way that the judge will be able to accept and so that you know your options when it comes to setting a court-ordered parenting plan.
Q. If dad is not listed on the birth cert does he need to be notified a of guardianship petition by maternal grandparents
A: Yes. You can look at the requirements in RCW 11.130 states all the requirements for a minor guardianship. It makes no difference if the birth certificate is complete or not. You must give notice to both parents. Now, if you are named the guardian for the minor child, you may also want to pursue a parentage action so that the father will have a monetary responsibility for the child even if he is not around. But your circumstances may demand a different course of action and consult with an attorney will help you see clearly so that you have the best chance of success.
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Contact & Map
Pacific Northwest Family Law
1359 Columbia Park Trail
Richland, WA 99352
Telephone: (509) 572-3700
Fax: (509) 572-3701
Monday: 8 AM - 5 PM
Tuesday: 8 AM - 5 PM
Wednesday: 8 AM - 5 PM
Thursday: 8 AM - 5 PM
Friday: 8 AM - 2:30 PM
Saturday: Closed
Sunday: Closed (Today)
Notice: We have someone answering phones 24/7
Pacific Northwest Family Law
216 S Palouse St
Walla Walla, WA 99353
Toll-Free: (509) 524-8488
Monday: 8 AM - 5 PM
Tuesday: 8 AM - 5 PM
Wednesday: 8 AM - 5 PM
Thursday: 8 AM - 5 PM
Friday: 8 AM - 2:30 PM
Saturday: Closed
Sunday: Closed (Today)
Notice: We have someone answering phones 24/7
Pacific Northwest Family Law
220 W. Main Ave
Spokane, WA 99201
Telephone: (509) 319-2900
Monday: 8 AM - 5 PM
Tuesday: 8 AM - 5 PM
Wednesday: 8 AM - 5 PM
Thursday: 8 AM - 5 PM
Friday: 8 AM - 2:30 PM
Saturday: Closed
Sunday: Closed (Today)
Notice: We have someone answering phones 24/7