Stanley Dale Radtke

Stanley Dale Radtke

Attorney at Law
  • Appeals & Appellate, Immigration Law, Criminal Law ...
  • California
Claimed Lawyer ProfileQ&ABlawg SearchSocial MediaResponsive Law
Practice Areas
    Appeals & Appellate
    Civil Appeals, Federal Appeals
    Immigration Law
    Asylum, Citizenship, Deportation Defense, Family Visas, Green Cards, Immigration Appeals, Investment Visas, Marriage & Fiancé(e) Visas, Student Visas, Visitor Visas, Work Visas
    Criminal Law
    Criminal Appeals, Drug Crimes, Expungement, Fraud, Gun Crimes, Internet Crimes, Sex Crimes, Theft, Violent Crimes
    Social Security Disability
Fees
  • Credit Cards Accepted
  • Contingent Fees
Jurisdictions Admitted to Practice
California
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9th Circuit
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Languages
  • German: Spoken
Professional Experience
Of Counsel
Mira Law Group, APC
- Current
I work with the Mira Law Group handling a diverse portfolio of matter, including immigration, deportation, criminal defense, and personal injury cases.
Appointed Counsel
First District Appellate Project
- Current
Appointed to the FDAP panel for indigent criminal appeals before the First District Appellate Court.
Associate Attorney
Law Offices of Haitham Edward Ballout
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Represent clients before EOIR Immigration Courts and handle immigration and deportation appeals before the Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA) and Petitions for Review before the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. Represent clients in Personal Injury Claims, Social Security Appeals, and Criminal matters.
Education
University of San Francisco School of Law
J.D. | Juris Doctor
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Professional Associations
Bar Association of San Francisco
Volunteer Pro Bono Attorney in Immigration Court
Current
Activities: Through the BASF, I volunteer in the San Francisco Immigration Courts as the pro bono attorney of the day to assist unrepresented Respondent's before the immigration court.
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Speaking Engagements
Legal Research in the Real World: Why is it so important? A Practitioner Panel, 2130 Fulton St., SF, CA
University of San Francisco School of Law
Legal Answers
79 Questions Answered
Q. Can i file for a case against someone who verbally said that she sent documents to immigration but it was not her money?
A: You cannot "file a case against someone" because it is only the federal government that can initiate an action against someone for immigration fraud. This of a criminal offense, you can report a crime, but only the district attorney can actually file a criminal complaint against someone.
Q. what is An applicant caused delay in asylum and how can i correct it
A: This is an often confusing area for everyone, including attorneys and court staff. Essentially, the EAD clock begins to run once your asylum application is properly filed either with the immigration court or the asylum office if filed affirmatively. The EAD clock stops counting if the applicant or the respondent does something to stop the clock. For instance, miss an appointment at the asylum office, ask for a change of venue in the court, or ask for a continuance to find an attorney. I suggest you consult with an experience immigration attorney how can assist you or provide you with accurate legal advice.
Q. selective service verification for citizenship
A: Failing to register for potential military service can ruin your showing of good moral character for naturalization purposes. If you are a man who lived in the U.S. or got your green card at any time between the ages of 18 and 26, you were expected to register with the U.S. Selective Service System. The Selective Service collects the names of young men who are available to be called up in a military draft. (See 50 U.S. Code Ch. 49.) The only exception likely to help you is if your entire time in the U.S. between ages 18 and 26 was covered by an unexpired nonimmigrant visa (for example, a student, tourist, or diplomatic visa). Another, less widely applicable exception is made for men born between March 29, 1957, and December 31, 1959—they were never under any obligation to register. For more information, see the Selective Service website. Notice, however, that no exception is made for undocumented or illegal aliens. They are expected to register. The Selective Service office states that it does not share this information with U.S. immigration authorities. Registering for Selective Service does not mean that you have to actually become a member of the U.S. armed forces. However, you are expected to be ready to join if a large-scale war or similar emergency arises. If you knew about the registration requirement and refused to put your name in, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) can deny your application for naturalized citizenship. Many young men find out when they fill out Form I-485 in order to adjust status and get a green card, because the form authorizes USCIS to provide your registration information to the Selective Service System. Do not assume, however, that USCIS actually took care of registering you. Is It Too Late to Register Now? If you are getting ready to apply for U.S. citizenship and you did not register for the Selective Service and are not yet age 26, it’s not too late. You can still register online or by mail or pick up the registration form at a U.S. post office, fill it out, and mail it in. Proving Good Moral Character If It’s Too Late to Register If you’ve passed age 26, it’s too late for you to register for the Selective Service. Your chances of qualifying for U.S. citizenship depend on how many years have passed since you were supposed to register and how many years of good moral character you need to show. If you need to show five years of good moral character, then the easiest thing might be to wait until you are age 31 to apply for citizenship. Or if you need to show only three years of good moral character (because you have been married to and living with a U.S. citizen all that time), you should wait until you are 29 years of age to submit your N-400 citizenship application. Proving That You Didn’t Know You Were Supposed to Register If you are eager to apply for citizenship before you turn 29 or 31 (as applicable), you may be able to show USCIS that you had no idea that registering was expected of you, and that you therefore didn’t “willfully” fail to register, by submitting these along with your naturalization application: a - Status Information Letter from the Selective Service System your sworn declaration, and sworn declarations from people who knew you. Obtaining a Status Information Letter A Status Information Letter from the Selective Service simply states that you are over-age and therefore no longer required to register. However, you need to get one, because USCIS will refuse to look at the rest of your materials without it. You can request the Status Information Letter from the Selective Service System website or by calling 847-688-6888.
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Contact & Map
Main Office
2450 Washington Ave.
Ste. 170
San Leandro, CA 94577
Telephone: (510) 863-8058