Mr. Albert Loch Saslow

Mr. Albert Loch Saslow

Hill Evans Jordan & Beatty, PLLC
  • Bankruptcy, Business Law, Family Law ...
  • North Carolina
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Summary

Loch Saslow is a 2009 graduate of Elon University School of Law’s inaugural class. Loch joined Hill, Evans, Jordan & Beatty following admission that year. Loch is a trial lawyer. He focuses his practice primarily in the areas of family law, bankruptcy, civil disputes, including business matters, and contractual issues, as well as Wills, Estates & Trusts.

A native of Greensboro, North Carolina, Loch holds a B.A. in History from Furman University in 2006 where he served as Community Service Chair of Sigma Nu Fraternity, played Club Lacrosse, and coached lacrosse at Riverside High School in Greenville, South Carolina. At Elon University School of Law, he was a member of the Business Law Society.

Loch is a member of the North Carolina State Bar, the American Bar Association, the North Carolina Bar Association, the Greensboro Bar Association, and the18th Judicial District Bar.

Practice Areas
  • Bankruptcy
  • Business Law
  • Family Law
  • Divorce
Additional Practice Area
  • Creditors' Rights & Collections
Fees
  • Credit Cards Accepted
Jurisdictions Admitted to Practice
North Carolina
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Languages
  • English
Professional Experience
Associate
Hill Evans Jordan & Beatty, PLLC
- Current
Education
Elon University School of Law
J.D. (2009) | Law
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Furman University
B.A. (2006) | History
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Professional Associations
North Carolina State Bar
Member
- Current
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American Bar Association
Member
- Current
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Greensboro Bar Association
Member
- Current
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18th Judicial District Bar
Member
- Current
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Websites & Blogs
Website
Legal Answers
28 Questions Answered

Q. Ex is behind in child support and take our child 6 weeks out of the year. Can those months be added as money owed me?
A: I'm not sure I quite understand the question, but will point out that child support and the rights of the non-custodial parent to see the child aren't connected. They are handled on completely different paths. To the extent he isn't paying, any efforts on your part to have him held in contempt or to modify the existing child support order are going to be handled on its own independent track. Likewise, any issue related to custody (contempt or modification) are going to be handled on its own independent track. Child support payments should be owed in a consistent manner - the amount owed per month should be the same regardless of whether he had any visitation scheduled during that particular month.
Q. I may know someone who is affected by parentification but do not know what to do.
A: I don't think I can provide an answer here as this doesn't appear to be a legal issue. While still young, this person is a 20 year old adult and can make their own decisions about how to interact with their family. If there are issues in this household, it would appear appropriate to involve a counselor as opposed to an attorney.
Q. What are the Fathers visitation and custody rights to a child born out a wedlock with him being on the birth certificate
A: Absent a court order that prohibits who can be around the child, or where the father can go with the child, you don't really have any say in what the father does with the child. And without a court order, either parent can deny access/visitation to the child. The best practice of a parent is to be open and honest with the other parent about who is around their child, the child's schedule, the child's activities, etc., but in reality that doesn't happen very often. What happens at moms house often stays at mom's house, and what happens at dads house often stays at dad's house. And that is generally what should happen most of the time, because the non-custodial parent shouldn't have the right/ability to micromanage what the other parent is doing. If you are worried about who dad is bringing to the house or where dad is going, you need to file for custody and attempt to get a court order that puts in place these boundaries.
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Contact & Map
Hill, Evans, Jordan, & Beatty PLLC
301 North Elm Street
Suite 700
Greensboro, NC 27401-2149
Telephone: (336) 379-1390
Fax: (336) 379-1198
Monday: 8 AM - 5 PM
Tuesday: 8 AM - 5 PM
Wednesday: 8 AM - 5 PM
Thursday: 8 AM - 5 PM
Friday: 8 AM - 5 PM (Today)
Saturday: Closed
Sunday: Closed
Notice: If you need to reach us outside of business hours, you can email us at generalmail@hillevans.com or fill out an online contact form at https://hillevans.com/contact-us/