Michael Hugh Carlin

Michael Hugh Carlin

Law Office of Michael Carlin PLLC
  • Immigration Law
  • Michigan
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Summary

Michael Carlin has years of experience working with immigrants to help them to become lawful permanent residents and citizens of the United States. Mike represents clients in Immigration Court and at USCIS immigration offices. Mike has also presented arguments before several U.S. Courts of Appeals, including the federal appeals courts in Washington DC and Chicago. Mike graduated with honors from the University of North Carolina School of Law, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, in 2001, where he received a full academic scholarship and was a staff member of the North Carolina Law Review. Prior to opening his own practice, Mike was a staff attorney at the International Institute of Metropolitan Detroit, where he represented many clients, both in Immigration Court and at the USCIS offices in Detroit and Chicago. Mike has also served as an Adjunct Professor at the University of Detroit Mercy School of Law, where he ran the Asylum Law Clinic. Through the Clinic, he supervised law students in the preparation of asylum applications with clients, and in the representation of those clients at the USCIS Asylum Office in Chicago and the Detroit Immigration Court. A fluent Spanish speaker, Mike has worked for a decade with people of Latin American heritage. His varied experiences prior to becoming a lawyer include working with Mexican farmworkers, asylum-seekers from El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras, and students and their families from the Dominican Republic. As an immigration lawyer, Mike has worked with immigrants from all over the world.

Practice Area
  • Immigration Law
Fees
  • Credit Cards Accepted
Jurisdictions Admitted to Practice
Michigan
Pennsylvania
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6th Circuit
7th Circuit
D.C. Circuit
U.S. Supreme Court
Languages
  • Spanish: Spoken, Written
Professional Experience
Attorney
Law Office of Michael Carlin PLLC
- Current
Attorney
International Institute of Metropolitan Detroit
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Adjunct Professor
University of Detroit Mercy
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Attorney
National Labor Relations Board
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Law Fellow
AFL-CIO
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Education
University of Michigan - Ann Arbor
M.A. (2007) | Education
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Honors: Full academic scholarship
University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill
J.D. (2001) | Law
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Honors: Full academic scholarship
Activities: North Carolina Law Review
Pennsylvania State University - University Park
B.A. (1989) | General Arts and Sciences
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Honors: Full academic scholarship National Merit Scholar
Professional Associations
State Bar of Michigan # P72567
Member
Current
National Immigration Project
Member
- Current
American Immigration Lawyers Association
Member
- Current
Websites & Blogs
Website
Law Office of Michael Carlin PLLC
Legal Answers
22 Questions Answered

Q. Can we file the I-130 form after my wife's visa expires?
A: You may file the I-130 at any time. You don't need to wait for anything in particular. Because your spouse has a J-1 visa, she might be required to return to her country for 2 years. So, we would need to determine whether she is required to return home for two years, and if she is required to do that, whether or not she might qualify for a waiver of that requirement.
Q. My husband has a ban, we have been married for 15 years and have 2 daughters, is there anything we can do?
A: You need to provide more detail on what you mean by "ban."
Q. How long does the deportation process usually take in the state of Michigan?
A: The answer to the question depends on a number of different things. If the person is detained by Homeland Security (ICE), then the process many times takes weeks or months, although depending on circumstances, could take a year or longer. If the person is not detained, then proceedings in Immigration Court could take years, sometimes many years.
Q. K1 visa, married, we have a child together and now he wants out
A: Did you ever apply for a green card? If you did, does your green card expire in 2 years, or in 10 years? I suggest that you consult directly with an experienced immigration attorney to go over the details of your case, and to plan a path forward. Best wishes to you!
Q. My husband left before he was forcibly removed, on his own, 5 months after receiving removal order. What is his bar?
A: The answer to your question depends on a number of factors, including the reasons why US immigration officials gave him an order of removal, his prior immigration history, and his prior encounters with police, other law enforcement officers, and courts. I suggest that you consult directly with an experienced immigration attorney to go over the complete history, and see what might be achieved in the future. Best wishes.
Q. my boyfriend has been here on a B2 almost 6 months..decided to get married..
A: The answer to your question depends on some factors that we would need to discuss with you and your boyfriend. I suggest that you consult with an experienced immigration attorney to carefully review all of the details of your situation, and to determine the best path forward. Best wishes to you.
Q. conditional marriage based green card
A: Although USCIS generally expects that married persons should be living together, it is possible to get an I-751 Petition approved while living separately. The difference between approval and denial will depend on the quality of the petition and supporting documentation. I suggest that you work with an experienced immigration attorney to avoid certain mistakes and to have the best chance of success. Best wishes to you.
Q. can i travel outside the united states and come back with a travel document without green card?
A: In order to know for sure, we would need to know some more information. On what basis did you obtain the travel document? What is your purpose for traveling at this time? What countries are you visiting? I suggest that you consult with an experienced immigration attorney before you decide to travel. Best wishes.
Q. Trick problem: I have a J-1 restriction and also overstayed my Tourist visa this year after marry. What to do?
A: We would need to review your immigration history completely to be able to give you an answer to your question. Part of the issue depends on the type of J-1 visa that you had, and the specific exchange program under which you obtained the J-1 visa. If it turns out that you are eligible for a waiver of the 212e requirement that you return to your home country for 2 years, and if you are granted the J waiver, then, the next question is whether you have any other grounds of inadmissibility. If our analysis of your situation results in a conclusion that you don't have any other grounds of inadmissibility, then it appears that you could adjust status to permanent residence in the US, without leaving, and without needing any further waivers. But again, we would need to review your history thoroughly to be able to provide you with answers. Best wishes to you.
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Contact & Map
Immigration Attorney
2340 E. Stadium Blvd.
Suite 5
Ann Arbor, MI 48104
USA
Telephone: (734) 369-3131
Fax: (734) 259-4801