Jeremy R. Summerlin

Jeremy R. Summerlin

Horton Law Firm, P.A.
  • Employment Law, Personal Injury, Business Law...
  • South Carolina
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Summary

I represent employees and businesses in multiple areas of employment law, such as discrimination (age, disability, sex, religion, or race), wrongful termination, the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), non-compete agreements, and wage theft, which includes unpaid wages, unpaid overtime, and minimum wage violations under the Fair Labor Standards Act. I can be reached personally via email at jsummerlin@hortonlawfirm.net and via telephone at 864.233.4351. Please visit our website at www.hortonlawfirm.net and our blog at www.hortonlawfirm.net/blog for more details about our services.

Practice Areas
  • Employment Law
  • Personal Injury
  • Business Law
  • Construction Law
Fees
  • Credit Cards Accepted
  • Contingent Fees
Jurisdictions Admitted to Practice
South Carolina
4th Circuit
Languages
  • English: Spoken, Written
Professional Experience
Employment Attorney
Horton Law Firm, P.A.
- Current
Associate Attorney
Law Office of W. Andrew Arnold, P.C.
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Law Clerk
Department of Justice, Office of Legal Education, National Advocacy Center
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Law Clerk
Protection & Advocacy for People with Disabilities, Inc.
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Law Clerk
Palmetto Family
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Intern
13th Circuit Solicitor's Office
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Education
University of South Carolina School of Law
J.D. (2013) | Law
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Bob Jones University
B.A. (2009) | History, English
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Professional Associations
South Carolina State Guard
1LT, JAG Corps
- Current
North Greenville Medical Campus Community Advisory Council
Member
- Current
Greenville County Bar Association
Member
- Current
South Carolina Bar  # 101383
Member
- Current
Greenville PULSE
Member
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Websites & Blogs
Website
Our Firm
Legal Answers
33 Questions Answered

Q. If my job gave me holiday pay and I seen it before time went in can they turn around and take it back from you
A: If the holiday was given by mistake, then the company can take it back. If the pay was lawfully earned by the employees or owed pursuant to a policy or contract, then the company should not be able to take it back.
Q. Remote employee confused on which state to seek legal help in regards to an already signed, non-compete agreement.
A: If you work in South Carolina, then South Carolina law would apply, unless there's a provision in the contract that says that another state's laws would apply.
Q. Terminated after being charged at. Was charged with Assault and battery 3rd degree. Case dismissed. Can I sue employer?
A: If the police charged you with a crime, the employer is legally allowed to fire you. SC is an at-will employment state, and unless the termination is based on discrimination on the basis of age, race, disability, sex, religion, or national origin, then you don't have a basis to sue your employer.
Q. Can you sue a former employer for being a bully? Threatening you by intimidation to the point of being fearful of job
A: Not unless the bullying was based on your age, race, sex, disability, national origin, or religion. Regular bullying is not necessarily against the law.
Q. What do I do when I work at a store that has highly unethical and borderline illegal practices
A: If the unethical conduct violates the law, then you can report such conduct to the appropriate authorities. It depends greatly on the exact facts of your case as to whether you would be protected from retaliation if you report the misconduct. You should seek counsel with an experienced employment lawyer to review your situation and determine what options you might have.
Q. I recently left a company with a non-compete that specifies a territory "within the United States". Is this enforceable?
A: The answer depends very much on the exact language of the non-compete. SC law requires that a non-compete be limited reasonably in time (three years or less, generally) and reasonably in geographic scope, among other requirements. If you serviced customers all over the US, then the agreement MAY tend to be more enforceable. However, there are defenses that can raised to the enforcement of non-compete agreements. You should schedule a consult with an experienced non-compete lawyer in South Carolina to have your agreement reviewed, prior to taking the new job if possible. Ultimately, even if the agreement is unenforceable, the employer can still sue you and your new employer and cost you thousands of dollars in attorneys' fees before the enforceability of the agreement is ever determined by the court.
Q. At work of they ask you to leave early due to labor can you legally say no in leaving.
A: You can say no, but your employer would have every right to fire you for insubordination. SC is an at-will employment state, so unless the decision to send employees home is motivated by race, age, disability, sex, or other protected reason, the employer can send people home early.
Q. As a Supervisor, Is it retaliation if I’m terminated due to employee accusations against me of retaliation?
A: No, retaliation is only when YOU make a legally protected complaint (of discrimination, for example) and then the employer fires you or takes other adverse employment action against you.
Q. Incorrect job classification results in unfair pay. Can I sue?
A: Unfair pay can be negotiated to a more fair salary amount, but there's no legal claim for it. The only exception is for cases where you have been misclassified as exempt from overtime pay but you are, in fact, working overtime hours without getting paid overtime (in other words, you might be getting a salary, but you don't supervise any employees or have discretion to make important decisions, and therefore should be getting overtime when you work more than 40 hours in a week). If you can't negotiate a fair amount of pay, you can always look for a better job elsewhere.
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Contact & Map
Horton Law Firm, P.A.
307 Pettigru Street
Greenville, SC 29601
USA
Telephone: (864) 233-4351
Fax: (864) 233-7142