Jason Brooks

Jason Brooks

  • Entertainment & Sports Law, Business Law, Communications & Internet Law...
  • California
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Claimed Lawyer ProfileQ&ASocial Media
Summary

Jason provides transactional business and legal affairs services to content creators across a wide spectrum of the creative community. Specializing in the new media, entertainment and business space, Jason frequently works with scripted/unscripted TV producers, social media influencers, and business entities to review, draft and negotiate deal terms on a wide range of production-related projects. Jason also provides business development strategy and corporate counsel to a variety of emerging players in the digital space. If you’re an influencer looking to monetize your content, a new business looking to establish your legal entity or register a trademark, or a digital content platform looking to draft your service/campaign agreements, terms of service and/or a privacy policy, let Jason be your guide. Raised in Southern California, Jason graduated from UCSD in 2002 with a B.A. in Communications. He earned his J.D. from the University of Wisconsin Law School in 2006 and returned to Los Angeles to pursue his legal career in the entertainment industry. In his spare time, Jason is also an LA County Ocean Lifeguard and an avid surfer. If meeting in an office isn’t your thing, Jason is happy to schedule a consultation or strategy session out in the water.

Practice Areas
  • Entertainment & Sports Law
  • Business Law
  • Communications & Internet Law
  • Trademarks
  • Intellectual Property
  • Landlord Tenant
Additional Practice Area
  • Digital Media
Fees
  • Contingent Fees
    Subject to our discretion, on a case-by-case basis only.
  • Rates, Retainers and Additional Information
    We offer Fee hour, Flat Fee and Percentage Fee rates depending on the type of work/representation needed. Payment accepted via cash/check, Electronic Bank Trasnfer, PayPal and Venmo.
Jurisdictions Admitted to Practice
California
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Education
U of Wisconsin
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Professional Associations
California State Bar # 249344
Member
- Current
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Websites & Blogs
Website
Legal Answers
104 Questions Answered

Q. Hello, What type of protection for intellectual property is needed when creating a type of ”free weight”?
A: Without more detail about your questions it's difficult to provide a more specific answer, but generally you would have two options from what you're described: 1) if the free weight you're asking about has some newly invented features, it may qualify for a patent. 2) If you are simply in the business of selling basic free weight, then you may want to trademark your brand name. If you would like to discuss either of these in greater details, feel free to email me anytime: Jason@altviewlawgroup.com
Q. I’m looking to copyright a brand. I searched and there is currently a copyright for the same name already.
A: I think you are confusing copyright with a trademark, as what you are describing sounds much more like you are looking to trademark the name of of your brand. In such a case, registration applications are filed with the US Patent & Trademark Office for the mark you are intending to use and protect. A mark can be protected in a number of International Classes, depending on the specific stream of commerce in which you are intending to use the mark. In this case, bar/food are arguably different streams of commerce from clothing, however you may run into a "likelihood of confusion" in catering, thus barring you from being able to register the trademark -- to make an accurate determination though, would require running a more thorough analysis of the mark you are referring to. If you would like further assistance or would like to discuss thus further, feel free to shoot me an email at: jason@altviewlawgroup.com
Q. Hi! I´m an illustrator and i wanted to know if it is necessary to trademark my name and copyright my work or is it not?
A: By law, a Common Law copyright is created the moment you put your work into tangible form (i.e. once you create an actual work, beyond just the idea in your head). If you have a copyrighted work, you are authorized to sue for damages if someone uses that work without authorization, however with common law copyright, you must show actual damages in a lawsuit in order to actually get money, whereas, registering your copyrighted work with the US Copyright office entitles you to claim statutory damages per infringement, without the need to prove that you suffered actual monetary damages -- in other words, it's always a good idea to register your work with the Copyright office. As for your symbol/logo, that's also advisable to register for trademark so you can create brand recognition and no one tries to pas their work off as yours.
Q. Please let me the process and needed documents to get tradmark.
A: Trademark applications for US registration are filed online via USPTO.org -- for a new registration, the costs are $275 per mark, per "class", plus whatever service fees your lawyer or service agency charges (if you choose to use assistance) -- It's possible to prepare the application yourself, but not advisable as the process can be tricky and a lot of time and money can be wasted if the application is not completed properly the first time. If done right, the entire process takes about 7-10 months My firm handles TM's -- if you'd like assistance filing your application, feel free to email me to discuss: Jason@altviewlawgroup.com
Q. Hello, If I see a trademark name has expired and not been renewed, can I claim that ?
A: Technically, yes -- but you have to understand that "claiming" the mark is not the correct description -- you have the right to prepare and file a new registration application with the USPTO and go through the entire registration process for the mark you'd like to claim. This process requires the same steps that any new TM registrant must follow, including demonstrating that you are using the mark in commerce, among other qualifying factors to be reviewed by the USPTO examining attorney(s). There is no procedure whereby you can just "claim" the mark as your own.
Q. TM search & no results, google search showed 2 others with Instagram accts w/ same name
A: In its most general sense, actual use of a potential trademark is what creates rights and priority over others. Thus, the rule in successfully registering a trademark is that ownership of a mark goes to the first-to-use, not the first-to-file. It is still important to get your application in as early as possible, but it's more important that you are able to designate that you were the first to use that mark in commerce. If successful, you should be granted the trademark and will then be able to assert your rights over others who are using the same mark within your "stream of commerce." If you need further assistance with this, feel free to email me at: Jason@altviewlawgroup.com
Q. I am writing a screenplay for a biopic of a celebrity and I am wondering if I have the rights to sell the script.
A: You may copyright the script, and sell it, however the celebrity's life rights must be obtained before the script could be produced. A buyer would most likely condition the sale on the ability to clear those rights. If you have additional questions or need clarification you can feel free to email to me at: Jason@altviewlawgroup.com
Q. I have a software company; how do I file a trademark for my brand?
A: To add to the previous response below, your federal registration application can be filed with the USPTO online at: https://www.uspto.gov/trademark It's not necessary that you have an attorney file your application for you, but it's always a good idea to consult an attorney because the application process can be tricky and there's limitations to the kinds of changes you can make to an application once it's been filed. If you need assistance, feel free to email me at: jason@altviewlawgroup.com
Q. Does “abandonment” mean this company is no longer trademarked and is able to be claimed by someone else ?
A: An abandoned mark is no longer registered within that particular class, so yes it’s available to another registrant but you’ll still have to prepare and file a new registration application with the USPTO to claim the mark.
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Contact & Map
Los Angeles Office
12100 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 800
los angeles, CA 90025
USA
Telephone: (310) 230-5580