Jammie Taire

Jammie Taire

Probate & Estate Planning. Over 20 years of experience!
  • Elder Law, Probate, Personal Injury...
  • Georgia
Badges
Claimed Lawyer ProfileQ&ASocial MediaResponsive Law
Summary

Jammie Taire has been in practice since 1998 After graduating from law school, she worked at one of the largest firms in Gwinnett county where she managed the will department and handled trial defense cases. She branched out and opened a solo practice in 2006. She prides herself on providing quality service for all of her clients. She was recently awarded a top rating with AVVO and also was named as a Top 100 with the National Advocates. She serves as a volunteer for the Gwinnett County probate clinic. Jammie currently also serves as a part-time magistrate in Gwinnett county.

Practice Areas
  • Elder Law
  • Probate
  • Personal Injury
  • Estate Planning
Additional Practice Areas
  • General Civil
  • Wills and Trusts
  • Special Needs Trusts
  • Guardianships
Fees
  • Credit Cards Accepted
  • Contingent Fees
Jurisdictions Admitted to Practice
Georgia
Placeholder image for jurisdictions.
Languages
  • English: Spoken, Written
Professional Experience
Managing Attorney
Law Office of Jammie Taire
Current
Part-Time Magistrate Judge
Gwinnett County government
- Current
Managing Attorney
Pollack and Rosen
-
Staff Attorney
Deming, Parker, Hoffman, Cambell & Daly
-
Education
Georgia State University
Law Degree
Placeholder image for education.
Awards
Top Rated Attorney
Avvo
Top 100
The National Advocates
Professional Associations
Greater Eastside Chamber of Commerce
Member
- Current
Placeholder image for professional associations.
Georgia Association of Women Lawyers
Member
- Current
Placeholder image for professional associations.
Gwinnett County Bar Association
Member
- Current
Activities: President - Family Law Section Elder Law Section Member
Placeholder image for professional associations.
Georgia State Bar
Member
- Current
Activities: Elder Law Section Family Law Section
Placeholder image for professional associations.
Websites & Blogs
Website
Legal Answers
7 Questions Answered

Q. Can heir property be taken from other heirs if the person who stay in the home leaves it to someone else in their will?
A: In order to properly answer this question, a little more information is needed. I am not clear on what you are considering "heir" property. In any event, a person can only leave what they have so even if the person is staying in the property that does not necessarily give them title to the property (we will not get into a squatter's right situation). If the property is owned by several people, the person can only leave their portion in the will. It also needs to be determined if the property has ever been properly conveyed to the heirs. Just briefly, a squatter may have rights if they have been in possession of the property openly and without permission for a period of 7 years and the owners have neglected the property. I would suggest you and the "heirs" contact an attorney to look into this issue. Hope this helps.
Q. I met this guy a few months ago who lived alone. He just lost his wife and his mom and was really depressed.
A: Hello: This sounds like a really bad situation and my first response would be for you to leave and get yourself out of this situation. Your safety is of the utmost importance. I am not sure of the question. What is your specific question?
Q. My mom died (90) I was her caregiver and live in her home with her for 29 years, she had credit debt will I loss my home
A: First, let me express my sincere sympathy regarding the loss of your mother. The answer to your question depends on many things and there is not enough information to provide a thorough answer. We would need to know whether your mother had a will, how the property was deeded, how much debt your mother had, how much credit card debt she had, whether there are siblings, amongst other things. Generally, you would not necessarily lose your mother's home because of credit card debt. Your mother's estate would need to be probated and an inventory of the estate would need to be conducted to determine the condition of the estate. We would need to determine which creditors file a claim and the priority of the claims. It would also need to be determined whether there is a mortgage on the house and how much is owed or the value of the house. We would be happy to assist you in the probate of your mom's estate. Please feel free to give us a call.
Q. What can I do to protect my spouse that is not co-buyer on a home if i should pass away?
A: First, congratulations on your decision to purchase a home. This is a big step and I commend you and your spouse for electing to make this investment! One option available to you is to speak to the closing attorney and have the deed prepared in both names with joint right of survivorship. This will put your spouse on the deed to the property and if either of you pass, the property will pass by operation of law without the necessity of going through the probate process for the property. Your mortgage will still need to be paid; however, there are tools available to you now to be sure you and your spouse are protected in the event the inevitable happens. Again, congratulations on your decision to purchase a house! Please feel free to contact our office to discuss preparing a will or other important estate documents.
Q. Can a trustee use funds from an irrevocable trust to create a new irrevocable trust for a different beneficiary?
A: This can be considered a difficult and loaded question without the benefit of looking at the language in the trust. As a general answer, I will say that this is possible. It is called decanting. If you are concerned about the trustee you may reach out to the trustee or consult with an attorney so they can review the trust for you.
Q. What rights do I have as a heir so that everything doesn't go to my half siblings when my step mother passes?
A: I would like to express my condolences for the loss of your father. From the information you provided, I assume that your Father did not have a will at the time of his death. As such, in GA, his assets would be divided between your step-mother and his children with the step-mother taking no less than 1/3. If there are two children then each of you and the spouse get 1/3. If there are three children - then the three children would split 2/3 and the spouse would get 1/3. Therefore, if no one has probated your Father's estate this would need to be done immediately. Once your step-mom passes, how her assets pass is up to her. If she has a will, it will go according to her will. If she does not have a will, her assets will go to her children. If you do not probate your Father's estate this can make probating of her estate messy and difficult. I would suggest you consult with an attorney for follow-up on this issue.
Q. I was one day late giving answer to the eviction. I emailed the court yesterday on the final day to let them know I was
A: This is a difficult time. Under Georgia law, when someone files a dispossessory action against you, you have 7 days to file an answer from the date it is served (service may be posted on your door). If you do not file the answer within the seven (7) days the landlord can get an writ against you immediately; however, Georgia does not allow self-evictions. Therefore, although the landlord can get the writ the writ still has to be executed. Although you may not have a remedy to stay in the property you may have a separate civil action against the landlord if you incurred damages.
Click here to see all answers
Contact & Map
440 S Perry Street
Lawrenceville, GA 30046
USA
Toll-Free: (678) 253-8133