J. Richard Kulerski Esq.

J. Richard Kulerski Esq.

  • Arbitration & Mediation, Divorce, Family Law
  • Illinois
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Claimed Lawyer ProfileQ&A
Summary

J. Richard Kulerski is a partner in the Oak Brook (and downtown Chicago) divorce law firm of Kulerski and Cornelison. Richard has over four decades of trial experience in the divorce courts of Cook and DuPage counties, IL. and is a Harvard trained mediator and settlement negotiator. Richard and his partner, Kari Cornelison, are staunch advocates of the settlement approach to divorce and both are active in divorce mediation, collaborative divorce law and in the rapidly growing cooperative divorce movement.

Practice Areas
  • Arbitration & Mediation
  • Divorce
  • Family Law
Jurisdictions Admitted to Practice
Illinois
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Professional Experience
member - Board of Directors
Mediation Council of Illinois
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Education
Loyola University Chicago
Undergraduate
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DePaul University
J.D.
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Benedictine College
Undergraduate
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Professional Associations
Illinois State Bar
Member
Current
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Collaborative Law Institute of Illinois
Fellow
- Current
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DuPage Bar Association
Sustaining Member
- Current
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Publications
Articles & Publications
The Secret to a Friendly Divorce
Wasteland Press
Divorce Buddy System
Author House
Websites & Blogs
Website
Kulerski & Cornelison's Website
Legal Answers
482 Questions Answered

Q. How is real estate equity divided after a divorce if one spouse owned the house with equity prior to marriage?
A: It makes a huge difference if the spouse who owned the property prior to the marriage ever transfered co-ownership to the other spouse during the marriage. This is a vital fact that you have not provided. If he or she did put the property in co ownership, then the property is most likely a marital asset, which is likely to be divided 50-50, depending on some other facts that you have not disclosed to us. If the house has always been in the name of the owning party, then the home is not likely going to be deemed a marital asset, and there will be no division of equity, as such. However, the spouse whose name is not on title may have some claim to reimbursement of the marital funds that benefitted the owning party's non-marital estate.
Q. In il ,self employed .new cliant and recieved first check from them way earlier then expected.
A: Whatever you are trying to avoid will not be avoided by waiting to deposit the funds until after you file. If the funds to be deposited are marital or not, the mere filing is meaningless and makes no difference.
Q. We are trying to settle out of court but differ greatly on the division of marital and non marital assets.
A: I do not know what your question is, but one thing is for sure: Spouse Two's $100,000 "inheritance" does not matter in any way until it is received.
Q. What does summons retd ns mean in a divorce? Does that mean the divorce was cancel.?
A: No, it does not mean the divorce is cancelled. It merely signifies that the Summons was not served. The party that filed the divorce may cause an Alias Summons to issue, and this can continue until Service is had.
Q. I am currently trying to divorce my husband he was telling me husabnd not allowed to tell me the lawyer's name or number
A: Your husband is pulling your leg. He probably hasn't actually hired a lawyer and is just pretending that he has. No lawyer would ever tell his or her client that they shouldn't disclose their identity to the client's spouse.
Q. Petition for divorce was entered and Date set. Decided not to get divorced but now want to proceed. How do I reopen?
A: The answer to your question would depend on whether you caused your case to be dismissed, and how and when it was dismissed. You have not furnished enough facts to enable a responsible answer. Filing a new case may be easier than trying to revive the first case.
Q. Confused - downsides of getting a prenup and declaring assets ahead of time? Is it better to hide premarital assets?
A: If you want your pre-nuptial agreement to be valid, you MUST list ALL of your assets. It's for your own protection. Besure to provide in your agreement which state's law will apply in the event of a divorce. You can specify this. A lawyer can advise you how to handle assets acquired and money earned during the marriage.
Q. Can a spouse receive alimony in IL from a spouse who receives VA service-connected disability compensation?
A: Yes, the income from veteran disability benefits can definitely be included (but not garnished) when computiing the veteran's alimony obligation.
Q. Do you need to declare liquid assets that have a beneficiary in a prenup in illinois (bank accounts and retirement)?
A: If you are merely the beneficiary, the asset is not yours and you do not have to list it. However, if it is your account and someome else is the beneficiary, then you should and must list it. Doing so is for your own protection going forward.
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Contact & Map
Oak Brook Terrace Office
1 S 660 Midwest Road
Suite 320
Oak Brook Terrace, IL 60181
USA
Telephone: (630) 928-0600
Fax: (630) 928-0670
Chicago Office
47 W. Polk Street
Suite M11
Chicago, IL 60605
USA
Telephone: (312) 235-0100
Fax: (630) 928-0670