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Gabriel A Watson

  • Personal Injury, Medical Malpractice, Insurance Claims ...
  • Oregon
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Claimed Lawyer ProfileQ&AResponsive Law
Practice Areas
  • Personal Injury
  • Medical Malpractice
  • Insurance Claims
  • Employment Law
  • Workers' Compensation
  • Products Liability
  • Business Law
  • Civil Rights
  • Environmental Law
Additional Practice Area
  • Land Use and Planning
Fees
  • Free Consultation
    Insurance companies are staffed by professionals whose job is to hold on to what you deserve. Before you speak to them you deserve to talk with someone who is on your side. A lot of law firms also represent insurance companies--I don't. Every week I give free consultations to people who want to know their legal options--that's why I started the Everyday Advocate Podcast - to make sure ordinary people like you, have full access to justice. Unfortunately, too many lawyers don't get to know their clients or the problems they face, they don't explain the law, or examine the resources available. I started Watson Law to be different. If you or a loved one has been hurt, discriminated against, or suffered at the hands of someone with more money or more power -- and you feel the need to find an attorney -- I'm on your side. Period. I know how the insurance companies, big businesses, and bullies work--and I've chosen to work for ordinary, honest people like you.
  • Credit Cards Accepted
  • Contingent Fees
    I take many cases on a 'contingent fee' basis. This means that I don't get paid for my time until you recover for the damage caused to you by somebody else. Before I became an attorney I was a firefighter and paramedic, where I learned first hand that many people who are injured or harmed by the negligence or bad acts of others, do everything they possibly can before seeking the help of an attorney. This often leaves them near penniless, harmed, and afraid of losing everything they have. Too often, the damage they've suffered becomes a barricade between these good people and the justice they deserve. I don't work for insurance companies and I don't represent bullies. I believe in people. We are in this fight together.
Jurisdictions Admitted to Practice
Oregon
Oregon State Bar
ID Number: 190401
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Languages
  • English: Spoken, Written
Education
Lewis & Clark Law School
J.D. (2019) | Law
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Honors: Honor Board
Activities: Moot Court
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University of Oregon
B.A. (2002) | Business and Political Science
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Professional Associations
Oregon State Bar  # 190401
Member
- Current
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Oregon Trial Lawyers Association
Member
- Current
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Multnomah County Bar Association
Member
- Current
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American Association for Justice
Member
- Current
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American Bar Association
Member
- Current
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International Association of Firefighters
Member
- Current
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Legal Answers
12 Questions Answered

Q. When a landlord wishes to sell and the realtor uses your name, plus claims you have no lease ?
A: It will depend on specifics but you could have a number of different claims against the different parties you refer to. Begin by looking at the terms contained in your lease--or if you do not have a lease there will be other rules that apply depending on the nature of your relationship with the landlord. If the realtor is spreading false information about your business, and if that information is causing your business harm, you could also have claims for this. Many things are different or changing because of COVID and it is difficult to understand how all of the COVID related rules are going to impact situations such as yours.
Q. To force Police to provide as FOIA on a closed murder case how can i find a person to do that in Oregon
A: FOIA requests can generally be made by any person to any federal agency, but requests can also be denied for any number of reasons. If you are requesting information from a local police department, this is often done using a public information request. Unfortunately, although anyone can make a public information request, different agencies will often fail to give such requests the attention they deserve. Either the response will be delayed, lost in bureaucratic red tape, or otherwise not answered with the information being requested. Begin by contacting the agency and requesting the information directly. Depending on the response you get or do not, you might want to contact an attorney. Although there will be costs associated with engaging an attorney--their familiarity with the process will increase the likelihood of your request receiving the attention it deserves and could very well make the difference between success and failure in terms of time and production.
Q. Are Payroll records covered under Hipaa laws? Is it illegal for me to see them if I've been given access in the past?
A: HIPAA stands for Health Insurance Portability and Profitability Act and as Mr. Stevens' explains, relates to personal healthcare information. HIPAA laws don't relate to payroll, rather, they relate to medical treatments and protecting information from persons or entities who have no business/billing/legal reason for accessing it. If you have access to all of the information maintained by your employer, depending on what type of company you work for, it is possible that HIPAA protected information is 'at your fingertips' but this does not mean you are allowed to look at the information in the absence of a business, and/or legal, reason for doing so. Because HIPAA laws are very nuanced and esoteric, the responsibility for maintaining and protecting this privileged information falls on the employer who in the eyes of the law, is equipped for the task. If you are the only person in the office it makes sense that you have access to most, or all, of the company's information. Unlike large businesses, where staff serve more specific and isolated roles, in smaller companies individuals often wear many hats at the same time. But again, this doesn't mean you have the right to access information maintained by the company. An employment attorney can help you better understand the wage and hour laws that apply to your situation. Employers, regardless of size, are required to make certain information available to every employee--if this isn't happening, then your employer could have exposure. Depending on your situation, it may or may not make sense to pursue this legally--especially if your primary concern is with knowing the hours that are available to you and you believe your employer is not keeping this information from you for improper reasons. Moreover, if you have a good working relationship with your employer, or you are comfortable discussing this with your employer directly, not involving an attorney could make even more sense. The bottom line is this--you should have access to your own records and if you have access to the records of others, you should only actually access the information for legitimate business purposes. It might not be a violation of the law that will get you in trouble, but it could expose your employer to problems and the fallout could very well impact you.
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Contact & Map
Watson Law Office PC
1822 SE Taylor Street
Portland, OR 97214